Posts tagged #report

Hollywood Needs To Look Inward And Push For Less Violent Movies and TV Shows

A new study in the Journal of American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry reports youth suicides among kids ages 10-17 increased to a 19-year high in the month after Netflix released the show “13 Reasons Why” which depicts a teen girl taking her life.

The U.S. youth suicide rate was 29% higher among children ages 10-17 than the previous year.

However, the study can’t prove the Netflix show was the cause of the teen suicides, but if we are honest with ourselves, we all know this show probably didn’t help either.

I’m sure you’ve heard people say that movies are “art” and it’s “fiction” and therefore the excessive violence, sexual content and overall vulgarity of what passes for modern entertainment has no influence on the behavior of the viewers.

This is just a lie. Images are powerful. If visuals weren’t then why are so many addicted to pornography? Images are incredibly powerful and can have a profound effect on certain viewers. Of course, not all that watch a violent film or an overly sexual television program will commit crimes or regrettable acts. However, many in our society will be influenced by these programs to make possible life-changing mistakes.

While no study can definitively prove a violent movie caused someone to commit horrible acts or a TV show about teen suicide caused young adults to commit suicide, for Hollywood celebrities to say violent content doesn’t have the potential to influence viewers is disingenuous.

If Hollywood wants to really do something about guns and violence, instead of protesting the Second Amendment and calling for more gun control, maybe instead they should first look inward at their entertainment industry and push for less violent content in movies, music, video games and on television.

The world is full of darkness. We need more light and positivity our world and in our entertainment. I encourage and challenge Hollywood to produce more uplifting stories including shows aimed at teenagers. Young adults could use a positive and encouraging message in our society.

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Chad Whittle, Ph.D. holds a doctoral degree in mass communication and is the host of “A Whittle Bit of Commentary.” Subscribe today to his podcast on Apple Podcasts, iTunes, Spotify, Stitcher, TuneIn, and Google Play. Read his daily column at ChadWhittle.com and follow him on Twitter and Facebook.

New Study Proves Americans Should Ignore Twitter Outrages The News Media Exploits

A new study from the Pew Research Center proves Twitter outrage should never be taken seriously and just ignored. According to their latest survey, only 22% of U.S. adults use the microblogging social site.

I started a long time ago ignoring so-called Twitter outrage that the press hypes to make it seem as though the entire nation is upset over some issue or situation the majority of America doesn’t know or care about at all.

Anytime I see a headline with the phrase “Twitter blows up” or something similar I instantly click on the next article or keep scrolling past it. The media treats the Jack Dorsey led site as a public opinion poll that is supposed to mirror the majority of Americans. This is fake news.

Pew Research reports among U.S. adults, a small percentage of users produces Twitter discourse. The top 10% by the number of tweets are responsible for 80% of all tweets by U.S. adults.

The median Twitter user only posts twice per month, follows 89 accounts, and has 25 followers.

When the percentage of U.S. adults is broken down by day, once again, the top 10% of tweeters say they use Twitter more than once per day (81%) while the bottom 90% of tweeters say they use the platform 47%.

With such a small percentage of the population using and posting on Twitter, the social network should never be used as a measurement of American public opinion on any issue, especially political issues. 

The social site makes it easy for the news media to blow an unimportant and insignificant situation out of proportion. There are new fake outrages daily on Twitter the media can use to exploit.

The only way this continuous cycle of fake outrage and fake controversies becoming national stories is for Americans to ignore these stories and not click the links on news websites.

The statistics in this study reports most Americans are already ignoring Twitter; they just need to learn to ignore the phony media outrages that come from the social app.    

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Chad Whittle, Ph.D. holds a doctoral degree in mass communication and is the host of “A Whittle Bit of Commentary.” Subscribe today to his podcast on Apple Podcasts, iTunes, Spotify, Stitcher, TuneIn, and Google Play. Read his daily column at ChadWhittle.com and follow him on Twitter and Facebook.